Cargohold Condition Survey with Virtual Reality

Posted Leave a commentPosted in 24marine, Drones, Insurance, Panama Canal, ROV, safety, smartsurvey

Every vessel or offshore installation, no matter the size and type, has a high potential accident opportunity. While the seaman, surveyors, contractors may be experts in one area, they may not be fully aware of the dangers and potential accidents that can happen onboard.

We in 24marine strongly believe that virtual reality can contribute to decrease the number of preventable accidents and bring a new dimension of details on the survey reporting systems. It has the potential to document conditions, detect failures, perform tests, and save lives in the long-term.

In the video below 24marine team conducted a Virtual Reality Survey on a Cargo Hold, using Enterprise Level Drones and Virtual Reality post-processing referring the spaces to the vessel drawings.  To navigate virtually inside the cargo hold, please click on this link http://www.24marine.com/vrcargohold/

Cargohold inspection with Virtual Reality by 24marine.com

The virtual replication of the surveys spaces allows decision makers to assess the survey areas, in details and without risking any life, a part of introducing big savings on scaffolding, equipment and preparation time. Below a summary of benefits of using virtual reality in cargo hold and confined spaces onboard ships:

  1. Increase quality.
    Virtual reality offers a common spatial experience that leads to better decision-making. Because there are almost no misinterpretations.
  2. Save time and money.
    By allowing a better pre-planning stage, as drones and virtual reality crew and sets are reduced compared with other techniques as scaffolding, ropes crews, cherry-pickers.
  3. Improve survey review.
    The inspected area gets recorded in real time (real life), can be analyzed and re-analyzed as many times as required.
  4. Reduce downtime.
    Surveys performed by drones and Virtual Reality, reduced the impact of surveys times on vessels busy and tied schedules.

LESSONS FROM THREE VESSELS COLLISION AT ANCHORAGE

Posted Leave a commentPosted in accident, 24marine, Insurance, Investigation, safety, smartsurvey

Details on the attached file.

Lesson Learned:

  1. Port administrations need to have an increased safety distance when the weather conditions are not favorable.
  2. During adverse weather conditions is recommended to have the engine on standby mode, since once the vessel start develop momentum it close to impossible to stop without engine.
  3. The anchor performance is heavily defendant on the amount of chain deployed, in order to have the anchor on the correct position to bite the floor.
  4. During heavy weather conditions the position monitoring need to be more often than in normal situations, there in the market many GPS for bridges with anchor monitoring alarm, that give officers on watch a ring when the threshold is passed.

This Incident was taken from Marine Accident Investigation Branch from UK.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/maib-safety-digests

24marine.com marine & cargo surveyors panama smart survey

Incompleted Maintenance the Cause of Vessel Fire (U.S. NTSB)

Posted Leave a commentPosted in 24marine, accident, Insurance, Investigation, safety

Interesting investigation from U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB).

The U.S. NTSB has determined that an insufficient preventative maintenance program and lack of guidance for responding to engine high-temperature conditions, led to the January 14, 2018, fire on board the small passenger vessel Island Lady, in the waters of the Pithlachascotee River, near Port Ritchey, Florida.

 

The NTSB’

s investigation determined:

  • • Tropical Breeze Casino Cruz’s lack of guidance regarding engine high-temperature alarms led to the captain leaving the port engine idling, rather than shutting it down, leading to the fire.
  • • The lack of a requirement for a fire detection and suppression system in an unmanned space containing engine exhaust tubing prevented early detection of, and a swifter response to, the fire in the lazarette.
  • • The captain’s decisions to return to the dock and to subsequently beach the Island Lady were prudent and increased the likelihood of survival for those on board.
  • • The failure of the port engine’s raw-water pump led to overheating of the engine and exhaust tubing.

    • The raw-water pump’s failure resulted from Tropical Breeze Casino Cruz’s failure to follow Caterpillar’s recommended maintenance schedule.

  • • The Island Lady’s crew had insufficient firefighting training.
  • • The use of plastic tubing on local tank level indicators and lack of automatic shutoff valves on the fuel tanks resulted in the release of diesel fuel, which contributed to the severity of the fire.
  • • The U.S. Coast Guard did not correctly assess the Island Lady’s fuel system’s compliance with applicable regulations during an inspection of the vessel.

 

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAWF_UR-_jI